Friday, January 18, 2013

Ten pictures of the New York winter we haven't had (yet)



Above: Sledding in Brooklyn Heights, from the corner of Henry and Joralemon Streets, according to the caption, ca. 1872-1887.  (Photographed by George Bernard Brainerd, courtesy Brooklyn Museum)

So far this has been pretty much been a low-accumulation winter in New York City, with only a half-inch of measured snow in Central Park so far this season. The worst snowfall was technically last fall,  with that sloppy Nor'easter which hit just a few days after Sandy.

But many of New York City's most powerful blizzards have actually occurred in the months of February and March -- from the legendary Blizzard of 1888 to the most recent Snowicane from February 2010.

These images of a snowy city gone by will feel less interesting once the next big snowstorm happens. But until then, enjoy! And have a wonderful Martin Luther King Jr. Day and safe travels if you're headed to the presidential inauguration.

Click on the pictures for a larger view. In particular, the picture at top and the 1914 photo below definitely have some spectacular details seen up close:


Somewhere in Brooklyn, 1888. Yes, that's a dog in the sled. (Photographed by Breading G. Way. Courtesy Brooklyn Museum)


Central Park coasting with the kids, 1914 (Library of Congress


Streets of snow in Harlem after a February blizzard in 1899. (LOC)


Manhattan streets after 1905 and 1910 snowstorms, rough going for horse-drawn vehicles. (LOC)

In the throes of a 1914 blizzard, literally stopping streetcars in their tracks. (LOC)

1948. (Courtesy LIFE/Cornell Capa)

And children in Central Park in 1954. Not so different from the scene above taken forty years earlier! (Peter Stackpole/LIFE)

George Washington, draped in snow on Wall Street, at the sub-treasury building (today Federal Hall), 1888. (LOC)

Seems they might have had the same idea one hundred years ago. The headline from the New York Tribune on January 19, 1913:

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