Wednesday, September 3, 2014

New York City's "stripped and abandoned" car crisis


The fate of an automobile at Breezy Point, 1973 (Courtesy US National Archives)

The abandoned car, that most dramatic symbol of urban blight, is a sight that has pretty much vanished from most New York City streets. (Most, not all.)  In a city refitted for the automobile by the mid 20th century, people just began leaving their cars everywhere, either vandalized beyond repair or too expensive to tow when their vehicles became unusable. These husks of metal were scavenged for parts, then left to rust, the city's sanitation crews unable to keep pace of the growing problem.

I recently found an intriguing article in New York Magazine from 45 years ago, titled "Stripped and Abandoned," outlining the causes of the city's sudden population of vehicular remains:

"Last year, by Department of Sanitation records, 31,578 cars were abandoned in New York City.  Some were wrecks; some were stolen, then stripped; some were involved ... in minor highway mishaps which caused their owners to leave them -- to expert instant strippers, who evidently abound."

By 1969, the problem had grown so unwieldy that the city hired third-party contractors to take care of most of it, but its budget for such removal would only shrink as the city entered the hard-knock 1970s.  Within a few years, the city would not even bother to remove such blight from certain neighborhoods.

"At any one time," wrote author Fred Ferretti in 1969, "there are about 2,000 cars strewn about the highways and local streets."

Below: From the New York Magazine article, the fate of a vehicle in Clinton Hill, Brooklyn, and on Delancey Street in the Lower East Side (photos by Robert D'Alessandro):



In 1970, standing in stark contrast to a city of polluted, automotive remains, one artist at the very first Earth Day celebration in Union Square attempted to address the problem.  A crushed sedan sat alongside the environmental merriment with a sign: "57,742 Cars Removed in 1969; 21,635 Removed in 1970, as of April 21."  The New York Times would later note a total of 72,961 abandoned cars in 1970. [source] [source]

Below: A lot of various skeletal remains in the Bronx, 1970s. (Camilo Jose Vergara, photographer)



They weren't just eye sores.  What wasn't pilfered or siphoned out was left to rot in the elements, leaking oil, attracting vermin.

New York City was only one problem spot within a new American crisis, with millions and millions of cars across the country already overfilling scrap yards.  Here, however, it was a harbinger of hard times on the way.

"Everywhere you look, there are abandoned cars, stripped and junked," said one resident of Brownsville, Brooklyn, returning to his deteriorating neighborhood in 1970.

A car almost completed ingested by Jamaica Bay, 1973  (Courtesy US National Archives)



Abandoned vehicles became the New York Sanitation Department's biggest issue in the 1970s, although by the new decade, there was some improvement.  According to a New York Times article from 1981:

"Total abandoned-car collections declined from more than 79,000 in 1978 to 33,112 last year and to 14,900 in the first half of this year, officials said. Robert Hennelly, chief of cleaning operations, said he thought the drop was ''perhaps because the cost of cars has gotten so high that people are holding on to them longer."

Some cynically still considered the abandoned vehicle to be a recognizable mark of New York City, even in the 1980s, a sort of native animal.

Not that an abandoned car couldn't have some useful purpose, as this picture by Camily Jose Vergara illustrates. (Click here for more of his terrific photography)



With the general infrastructural improvement of the city during the 1990s, the beast had receded somewhat from view in most neighborhoods.  There are still abandoned cars galore -- here's the city's current policy for reporting derelict vehicles -- but few are so unscrupulously picked clean or left to decay into a rusty shell.

Below: As with the others above, Jamaica Bay 1973, near JFK Airport (US National Archives)


1 comment:

  1. Ahh, memories. I remember as a kid looking out of the car window along the parkways heading upstate from Long Island or the Belt Parkway into Brooklyn were like driving through archaeological excavation sites. I always wondered how they got the cars so far into the channels - you could see them way out there in low tide.

    Living near the Cross Island Parkway just on the Queens line, they would leave cars in the underpass near us all the way into the early 80s.

    When on the Queens side, they'd be there so long exploring them we'd often find that older boys (I assume) had stashed caches of Playboy magazines in them.

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